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Navigating the Internet Waters in China / 中国网络探微


Author: Natalie Sammarco

Navigating the Internet Waters in China

I. Introduction
Billions of people use the Internet. Americans account for nearly 250 million of these users while the Chinese number upwards of 540 million. As US-Sino relations become closer both politically and economically, it only follows that bilateral business between the two countries should increasingly develop, and it has. We will discuss the current situation of the web in China and give a glossary of key media engines that should be explored if one is to do business in China. Since the Internet has never been more useful, or detrimental in some cases, knowing about Internet usage and how it is viewed in China will serve to help those conducting business between the US and China understand what concerns need to be taken into consideration.

II. Web Usage in China
The Internet is used in China for many of the same reasons it is used in the US: to buy things, to sell things, to watch videos, to read news, and to gather information. The role of the Chinese online community has changed drastically in the past decade given the pace at which information flows in and out of the country. Websites function much in the way that US ones do, although they have not developed as quickly or creatively in the advertising sphere as the United States.

Google has come under fire for their information-gathering tactics to provide users with advertisements focused on specific interests. For example, the company is known for ‘recording’ a user’s searches so that, when he or she chooses to use Google again, advertisements related to his or her previous searches will be displayed in the margins. In China, this occurs but in a less-aggressive way. When watching videos, a website could pull from a user’s previous searches to provide advertisements of interest, but not as often as when using Google. Since the Internet in China does not use such aggressive tactics just yet, China seems more ‘respectful’ of user’s information, but many Chinese are relentless in seeking ways to make money and one should expect that this aggressive style of marketing and advertising will be used in the future.

One example of the Chinese attempt to latch on to other’s moneymaking businesses is the counterfeit products market (e.g. miPhone, Luois Vuittion, Carteir). Logos are reproduced without respect for intellectual property rights and this is done because certain brands and products have gained attention around the globe. By reproducing nearly the same product with only slight differences, the counterfeiters hope to get a piece of the market. Given this knowledge, anyone doing business in China should expect Chinese to copy what is successful elsewhere, sometimes with the exact logo style or name. Concerning online endeavors, it is only a matter of time before websites use Google’s information-gathering tactic to gain more notoriety or customers.

Another key feature of China’s Internet is censorship. During the Arab Spring, protestors used social media to organize anti-government revolts and the world was witness to the power free flowing information can have on a country’s population. China has increased its surveillance of the Internet since then and has added thousands of new workers to help bolster online restrictions.

Media censorship has been a part of the Chinese Communist Party’s efforts to control the population for decades. The vast array of online servers that oversees these restrictions is called The Great Firewall and it is most noted for blocking US websites such as Youtube, Twitter, and Facebook. Although specific websites are blocked, many sensitive words are blocked from being searched at all. These sensitive words change almost daily, and are in accordance with official orders from propaganda departments. Multiple times per week, both online and hardcopy news outlets are given directives from propaganda departments to cease investigating or reporting on certain topics.

III. Chinese Internet and Business Relations
The types of topics that are censored in China are anything that could incite a negative reaction toward the country or government. China is very nationalistic and it is safe to assume that business partners in China will also be proud of China’s accomplishments in development in the past 40 years. While doing business in China, it would be best to stay away from mentioning anything that has been in Western news that may be seen as a poor reflection on the country. Since the Chinese are very concerned about ‘saving face’, mentioning this, even as an offhand comment during a lunch, could turn business relations sour.

Yet, there are many topics of conversation that are appropriate to bring up at a business meeting or meal.

Appropriate topics of discussion include:

- The city in which you are or are planning on doing business (What are some historical sites? Does it have any parks or lakes? Does the city have good transportation, subways, or high-speed trains?)

- Asking whether the business partner is from the area in which you are currently located (if not’s not obvious that he or she is not). Talking about hometowns can be a great topic of conversation.

- Food (local delicacies are a big topic of conversation in China. One can ask about the local food in the business partner’s hometown)

As with all conversation, if a sensitive topic comes up, react in a way that is respectful to your host and engage with him or her as facilitates smooth conversation.

Glossary of Media Outlets
There is a multitude of sources to use when marketing business and services online in China. The list below will name the most commonly used social media sites accessible on the web:

1) Sina Weibo – This is a micro-blogging website, which acts much like Twitter, in America. Since Twitter is blocked in China, Weibo provides this ‘status update’ blogging with friends. The government heavily monitors and in turn, sensors it if need be, and many users are blocked for bringing up sensitive subjects. It is very popular and provides the population an outlet to voice an opinion to news and user updates.

2) Tudou and Youku – Tudou (‘potato’ in Mandarin) was founded in 2005 and is the original online video company in China, which airs premium licensed content, user generated content, and in-house production. Essentially, it is the Chinese government-censored version of Youtube, which is blocked in Mainland China (but not in Hong Kong or Macau). Viral videos are commonly seen on Youku as well as television shows, movies, and news clips. Since intellectual property rights are not widely observed in China, one can find many shows, domestic and international, in their full, unedited versions, which would be illegal in the US. Tudou and Youku are great platforms to market commercials to engender excitement or teach people about one’s product or service.

3) iQiyi – iQiyi is a website which provides television series for Internet users. All the content is free.

** Tudou, Youku, and iQiyi are all very much like HBOGo, Hulu, and Netflix but are essentially free instead of having to sign up and pay for use.

4) MSN and QQ: MSN used to be the top instant messaging site in China but is fading more quickly now that other sites offer more services. QQ is short for Tencent QQ and was founded in 1998. At first it was primarily an instant messaging service, now it offers customers a variety of services, including micro blogging, online social games, music, shopping, and group & voice chat.

5) Weibo Professional – This is the section of Sina Weibo that offers comparable services to the US website, LinkedIn. It provides a platform upon which professionals can connect with one another, give introductions to new connections, and access job opportunities.

6) WeChat – WeChat (‘Weixin’ in China) is a web application that allows contacts to find one another via Internet/WiFi connection. The main service it provides is text and voice chat. It works overseas, between countries, as long as there is a solid online connection.

Conclusion
China has become one of the fastest developing markets for everything from affordable automobiles to designer earrings. The key to being successful in China is being familiar with cultural business practices and what role the Internet plays in the lives of the Chinese every day. Utilizing the aforementioned websites could be beneficial to any business looking to expand its China market. After all, there is a Chinese saying that says “Familiarity engenders genius”(熟能生巧).

Writer: Natalie Sammarco, Hopkins Nanjing Center MA ’14

作者:Natalie Sammarco

中国网络探微

1.简介

在全世界几十亿的网民中,美国网民占2500万,中国为5400万。随着中美政治、经济关系越来越紧密,中美双边贸易也日益增长。本文将讨论中国网络发展的现状,并给出一系列在中国经商所需的主流网站。网络在当今社会至关重要,但有时也会产生不良影响。从事中美贸易的人员若能了解网络的作用并领会网络在中国社会的地位,对他们的工作将大有裨益。

2.中国网络的作用

中美两国网络的作用在很多方面都是类似的:购物、销售、看视频、读新闻、搜集信息。在过去的十年间,随着大量信息流入、流出中国,中国网络的作用发生了巨大的变化。大部分中国网站的作用和美国网站并无差别,但就广告领域来说,中国网站无论从速度和创新上都无法与美国网站相比。
谷歌通过搜集用户信息为用户提供有针对性的广告,这一技俩已备受诟病。比如,谷歌会“记录”用户的搜索信息,当用户下次使用谷歌时,就会有与其之前搜索相关的广告出现在页面边栏。在中国,这种现象同样存在,但还不十分普遍。当用户观看视频时,网站上会出现根据用户之前搜索信息产生的广告。但是频率不如谷歌那么高。总之,和美国相比,中国网站还未竞相使用搜集用户信息的技俩。从这点来看,中国网络似乎更“尊重”用户信息。但是很多中国人都想拼命赚钱。可以想见,在不远的将来,像谷歌那种咄咄逼人的市场营销手段也会在中国出现。
说中国人想尽办法抢别人的生意、拼命赚钱不是无中生有的。一个生动的例子就是中国假货横行,什么miPhone, Luois Vuittion, Carteir等等,都是对名牌的仿冒。世界闻名的品牌、产品都能被拿来仿冒,完全不会尊重商标的知识产权。生产出来的假货几乎以假乱真,很多商家都希望以此来分一杯羹。中国市场上充斥着仿制品,有时甚至连商标都不改。任何一个在中国做生意的人看到这些仿制品都不应该感到惊讶。回到网络这个话题上,可以想象中国网站像谷歌那样暗中搜集用户信息只是时间的问题。到时候只会做得比谷歌更彻底。
中国网络另一个重要特征是中国网站需要接受审查。阿拉伯之春运动中,抗议者通过社交媒体组织反政府活动。世界因此认识到自由信息对一个国家人民的影响力。从那以后,中国严格了对网络的监控,并增加了数以千计的员工来帮助审查网络。
媒体审查一直是中国共产党几十年来管理国家所做的努力。监管服务器被称为“防火墙”。美国网站诸如Youtube, Twitter, Facebook之类就是由 “防火墙”拦阻的。除了具体的网站,还有很多敏感词会被屏蔽,不让搜索。这些敏感词日新月异,通常跟国家宣传部门的官方指令有关。每周宣传部门会在网上、纸质媒体上发布指令,要求限制某些话题的搜索。

3. 中国商务关系

任何可能引起对政府、国家有不良影响的话题都会被审查。中国人对中华民族是非常有认同感的。同样的,在过去40年间来中国经商的人也会为中国取得的成绩而感到骄傲。在中国经商,要注意避免谈论西方国家关于中国的负面新闻。中国人非常“爱面子”,如果在商务会餐上一不小心哪怕是提及某些有损中国形象的评论,也会导致生意失败。
那么,在商务会议或会餐上该讨论什么比较合适呢?下面将介绍几个适合商务场合的话题:
–你所在的城市,或者你打算去的城市。包括文物古迹,公园湖泊,交通状况(地铁、高铁等)。
–询问合作伙伴是否来自你所在的城市(如果显然不是的话就不要问了)。会谈中讲讲家乡总是不错的。
–食物(在中国,地方美食是个非常好的话题。你可以问你合作伙伴家乡有什么地方小吃。)

跟其他所有类型的谈话一样,如果在商务会谈中出现了敏感话题,首先应该尊重对方,然后配合对方让谈话顺利进行下去。

4.必备网站名录

在中国进行电子商务有很多可用的网络资源。下面将提到一些最常用的网络媒体:

1) 新浪微博—这是一个微型的博客网站,功能跟美国的Twitter非常像,但是Twitter在中国是不能用的。在微博上,你可以随时“更新状态”来跟朋友分享。政府对该网站监控非常严格,经常会有人因为提及敏感话题而被屏蔽。新浪微博在中国十分流行,它为广大用户提供了发表言论及更新状态的平台。
2) 土豆和优酷—土豆网(就是英文中的Potato)成立于2005年,是一家中国本土的网上视频公司。土豆网主要播出已经过初步审查的视频,用户拍摄的视频和内部制作的产品。本质上说土豆网就是中国政府监管下的Youtube。Youtube在中国大陆被禁,但香港、澳门除外。优酷网上播出的主要是“病毒视频”,电视剧,电影还有新闻片段。知识产权在中国保护得并不是很好,因此你可以在网上轻松地找到大部分国内外的影视节目,而且是未删减版。这在美国是非法的。土豆和优酷是广告宣传的绝佳平台。在此,你可以利用广告激起客户兴趣或者提供产品支持。
3) 爱奇艺—爱奇艺是网络电视,为用户提供各种免费的电视剧。
(注:土豆、优酷和爱奇艺跟美国的HBOGo, Hulu以及Netflix很相似,但跟美国的这些需要注册付费网站不同,土豆、优酷、爱奇艺都是免费的。)
4) MSN和QQ: MSN曾经是中国最大的即时信息网站,但在其他功能更全面的网站冲击下正在加速衰退。QQ是腾讯QQ的简称,成立于1998年。起初QQ只提供即时信息的服务,现在它的服务包括微博,网上游戏,音乐,购物以及群聊和语音聊天。
5) 微博专业版—这是新浪微博推出的美国Linkedin的姐妹版。在微博专业版上,专业人士可以互粉,并为新人作介绍,还可以得到工作机会。
6) 微信—微信是一个网络应用,可以让用户通过网络或Wifi来寻找朋友。微信主要的服务内容是信息和语音通讯。在海外或国外都可以使用,只要有网络连接。
5. 总结
不管是相对廉价的手机,还是高端的奢侈品,中国已经成为世界上增长最快的市场。在中国要想获得商业上的成功,关键要熟悉中国的文化、商业习俗,并了解网络在中国人日常生活中的地位。能够熟练运用以上提及的网站对希望扩大中国市场的外国商人来说是非常有好处的。中国有句话说得好:熟能生巧。

作者:Natalie Sammarco,中美中心国际关系硕士2014

Author: Natalie Sammarco

Navigating the Internet Waters in China

I. Introduction

Billions of people use the Internet. Americans account for nearly 250 million of these users while the Chinese number upwards of 540 million. As US-Sino relations become closer both politically and economically, it only follows that bilateral business between the two countries should increasingly develop, and it has. We will discuss the current situation of the web in China and give a glossary of key media engines that should be explored if one is to do business in China. Since the Internet has never been more useful, or detrimental in some cases, knowing about Internet usage and how it is viewed in China will serve to help those conducting business between the US and China understand what concerns need to be taken into consideration.

II. Web Usage in China

The Internet is used in China for many of the same reasons it is used in the US: to buy things, to sell things, to watch videos, to read news, and to gather information. The role of the Chinese online community has changed drastically in the past decade given the pace at which information flows in and out of the country. Websites function much in the way that US ones do, although they have not developed as quickly or creatively in the advertising sphere as the United States.
Google has come under fire for their information-gathering tactics to provide users with advertisements focused on specific interests. For example, the company is known for ‘recording’ a user’s searches so that, when he or she chooses to use Google again, advertisements related to his or her previous searches will be displayed in the margins. In China, this occurs but in a less-aggressive way. When watching videos, a website could pull from a user’s previous searches to provide advertisements of interest, but not as often as when using Google. Since the Internet in China does not use such aggressive tactics just yet, China seems more ‘respectful’ of user’s information, but many Chinese are relentless in seeking ways to make money and one should expect that this aggressive style of marketing and advertising will be used in the future.
One example of the Chinese attempt to latch on to other’s moneymaking businesses is the counterfeit products market (e.g. miPhone, Luois Vuittion, Carteir). Logos are reproduced without respect for intellectual property rights and this is done because certain brands and products have gained attention around the globe. By reproducing nearly the same product with only slight differences, the counterfeiters hope to get a piece of the market. Given this knowledge, anyone doing business in China should expect Chinese to copy what is successful elsewhere, sometimes with the exact logo style or name. Concerning online endeavors, it is only a matter of time before websites use Google’s information-gathering tactic to gain more notoriety or customers.
Another key feature of China’s Internet is censorship. During the Arab Spring, protestors used social media to organize anti-government revolts and the world was witness to the power free flowing information can have on a country’s population. China has increased its surveillance of the Internet since then and has added thousands of new workers to help bolster online restrictions.
Media censorship has been a part of the Chinese Communist Party’s efforts to control the population for decades. The vast array of online servers that oversees these restrictions is called The Great Firewall and it is most noted for blocking US websites such as Youtube, Twitter, and Facebook. Although specific websites are blocked, many sensitive words are blocked from being searched at all. These sensitive words change almost daily, and are in accordance with official orders from propaganda departments. Multiple times per week, both online and hardcopy news outlets are given directives from propaganda departments to cease investigating or reporting on certain topics.

III. Chinese Internet and Business Relations

The types of topics that are censored in China are anything that could incite a negative reaction toward the country or government. China is very nationalistic and it is safe to assume that business partners in China will also be proud of China’s accomplishments in development in the past 40 years. While doing business in China, it would be best to stay away from mentioning anything that has been in Western news that may be seen as a poor reflection on the country. Since the Chinese are very concerned about ‘saving face’, mentioning this, even as an offhand comment during a lunch, could turn business relations sour.
Yet, there are many topics of conversation that are appropriate to bring up at a business meeting or meal.
Appropriate topics of discussion include:
- The city in which you are or are planning on doing business (What are some historical sites? Does it have any parks or lakes? Does the city have good transportation, subways, or high-speed trains?)
- Asking whether the business partner is from the area in which you are currently located (if not’s not obvious that he or she is not). Talking about hometowns can be a great topic of conversation.
- Food (local delicacies are a big topic of conversation in China. One can ask about the local food in the business partner’s hometown)

As with all conversation, if a sensitive topic comes up, react in a way that is respectful to your host and engage with him or her as facilitates smooth conversation.

IV. Glossary of Media Outlets

There is a multitude of sources to use when marketing business and services online in China. The list below will name the most commonly used social media sites accessible on the web:

1) Sina Weibo – This is a micro-blogging website, which acts much like Twitter, in America. Since Twitter is blocked in China, Weibo provides this ‘status update’ blogging with friends. The government heavily monitors and in turn, sensors it if need be, and many users are blocked for bringing up sensitive subjects. It is very popular and provides the population an outlet to voice an opinion to news and user updates.

2) Tudou and Youku – Tudou (‘potato’ in Mandarin) was founded in 2005 and is the original online video company in China, which airs premium licensed content, user generated content, and in-house production. Essentially, it is the Chinese government-censored version of Youtube, which is blocked in Mainland China (but not in Hong Kong or Macau). Viral videos are commonly seen on Youku as well as television shows, movies, and news clips. Since intellectual property rights are not widely observed in China, one can find many shows, domestic and international, in their full, unedited versions, which would be illegal in the US. Tudou and Youku are great platforms to market commercials to engender excitement or teach people about one’s product or service.

3) iQiyi – iQiyi is a website which provides television series for Internet users. All the content is free.
** Tudou, Youku, and iQiyi are all very much like HBOGo, Hulu, and Netflix but are essentially free instead of having to sign up and pay for use.

4) MSN and QQ: MSN used to be the top instant messaging site in China but is fading more quickly now that other sites offer more services. QQ is short for Tencent QQ and was founded in 1998. At first it was primarily an instant messaging service, now it offers customers a variety of services, including micro blogging, online social games, music, shopping, and group & voice chat.

5) Weibo Professional – This is the section of Sina Weibo that offers comparable services to the US website, LinkedIn. It provides a platform upon which professionals can connect with one another, give introductions to new connections, and access job opportunities.

6) WeChat – WeChat (‘Weixin’ in China) is a web application that allows contacts to find one another via Internet/WiFi connection. The main service it provides is text and voice chat. It works overseas, between countries, as long as there is a solid online connection.

V. Conclusion

China has become one of the fastest developing markets for everything from affordable automobiles to designer earrings. The key to being successful in China is being familiar with cultural business practices and what role the Internet plays in the lives of the Chinese every day. Utilizing the aforementioned websites could be beneficial to any business looking to expand its China market. After all, there is a Chinese saying that says “Familiarity engenders genius”(熟能生巧).

Writer: Natalie Sammarco, Hopkins Nanjing Center MA ’14


作者:Natalie Sammarco

中国网络探微

1.简介

在全世界几十亿的网民中,美国网民占2500万,中国为5400万。随着中美政治、经济关系越来越紧密,中美双边贸易也日益增长。本文将讨论中国网络发展的现状,并给出一系列在中国经商所需的主流网站。网络在当今社会至关重要,但有时也会产生不良影响。从事中美贸易的人员若能了解网络的作用并领会网络在中国社会的地位,对他们的工作将大有裨益。

2.中国网络的作用

中美两国网络的作用在很多方面都是类似的:购物、销售、看视频、读新闻、搜集信息。在过去的十年间,随着大量信息流入、流出中国,中国网络的作用发生了巨大的变化。大部分中国网站的作用和美国网站并无差别,但就广告领域来说,中国网站无论从速度和创新上都无法与美国网站相比。
谷歌通过搜集用户信息为用户提供有针对性的广告,这一技俩已备受诟病。比如,谷歌会“记录”用户的搜索信息,当用户下次使用谷歌时,就会有与其之前搜索相关的广告出现在页面边栏。在中国,这种现象同样存在,但还不十分普遍。当用户观看视频时,网站上会出现根据用户之前搜索信息产生的广告。但是频率不如谷歌那么高。总之,和美国相比,中国网站还未竞相使用搜集用户信息的技俩。从这点来看,中国网络似乎更“尊重”用户信息。但是很多中国人都想拼命赚钱。可以想见,在不远的将来,像谷歌那种咄咄逼人的市场营销手段也会在中国出现。
说中国人想尽办法抢别人的生意、拼命赚钱不是无中生有的。一个生动的例子就是中国假货横行,什么miPhone, Luois Vuittion, Carteir等等,都是对名牌的仿冒。世界闻名的品牌、产品都能被拿来仿冒,完全不会尊重商标的知识产权。生产出来的假货几乎以假乱真,很多商家都希望以此来分一杯羹。中国市场上充斥着仿制品,有时甚至连商标都不改。任何一个在中国做生意的人看到这些仿制品都不应该感到惊讶。回到网络这个话题上,可以想象中国网站像谷歌那样暗中搜集用户信息只是时间的问题。到时候只会做得比谷歌更彻底。
中国网络另一个重要特征是中国网站需要接受审查。阿拉伯之春运动中,抗议者通过社交媒体组织反政府活动。世界因此认识到自由信息对一个国家人民的影响力。从那以后,中国严格了对网络的监控,并增加了数以千计的员工来帮助审查网络。
媒体审查一直是中国共产党几十年来管理国家所做的努力。监管服务器被称为“防火墙”。美国网站诸如Youtube, Twitter, Facebook之类就是由 “防火墙”拦阻的。除了具体的网站,还有很多敏感词会被屏蔽,不让搜索。这些敏感词日新月异,通常跟国家宣传部门的官方指令有关。每周宣传部门会在网上、纸质媒体上发布指令,要求限制某些话题的搜索。

3. 中国商务关系

任何可能引起对政府、国家有不良影响的话题都会被审查。中国人对中华民族是非常有认同感的。同样的,在过去40年间来中国经商的人也会为中国取得的成绩而感到骄傲。在中国经商,要注意避免谈论西方国家关于中国的负面新闻。中国人非常“爱面子”,如果在商务会餐上一不小心哪怕是提及某些有损中国形象的评论,也会导致生意失败。
那么,在商务会议或会餐上该讨论什么比较合适呢?下面将介绍几个适合商务场合的话题:
–你所在的城市,或者你打算去的城市。包括文物古迹,公园湖泊,交通状况(地铁、高铁等)。
–询问合作伙伴是否来自你所在的城市(如果显然不是的话就不要问了)。会谈中讲讲家乡总是不错的。
–食物(在中国,地方美食是个非常好的话题。你可以问你合作伙伴家乡有什么地方小吃。)

跟其他所有类型的谈话一样,如果在商务会谈中出现了敏感话题,首先应该尊重对方,然后配合对方让谈话顺利进行下去。

4.必备网站名录

在中国进行电子商务有很多可用的网络资源。下面将提到一些最常用的网络媒体:

1) 新浪微博—这是一个微型的博客网站,功能跟美国的Twitter非常像,但是Twitter在中国是不能用的。在微博上,你可以随时“更新状态”来跟朋友分享。政府对该网站监控非常严格,经常会有人因为提及敏感话题而被屏蔽。新浪微博在中国十分流行,它为广大用户提供了发表言论及更新状态的平台。
2) 土豆和优酷—土豆网(就是英文中的Potato)成立于2005年,是一家中国本土的网上视频公司。土豆网主要播出已经过初步审查的视频,用户拍摄的视频和内部制作的产品。本质上说土豆网就是中国政府监管下的Youtube。Youtube在中国大陆被禁,但香港、澳门除外。优酷网上播出的主要是“病毒视频”,电视剧,电影还有新闻片段。知识产权在中国保护得并不是很好,因此你可以在网上轻松地找到大部分国内外的影视节目,而且是未删减版。这在美国是非法的。土豆和优酷是广告宣传的绝佳平台。在此,你可以利用广告激起客户兴趣或者提供产品支持。
3) 爱奇艺—爱奇艺是网络电视,为用户提供各种免费的电视剧。
(注:土豆、优酷和爱奇艺跟美国的HBOGo, Hulu以及Netflix很相似,但跟美国的这些需要注册付费网站不同,土豆、优酷、爱奇艺都是免费的。)
4) MSN和QQ: MSN曾经是中国最大的即时信息网站,但在其他功能更全面的网站冲击下正在加速衰退。QQ是腾讯QQ的简称,成立于1998年。起初QQ只提供即时信息的服务,现在它的服务包括微博,网上游戏,音乐,购物以及群聊和语音聊天。
5) 微博专业版—这是新浪微博推出的美国Linkedin的姐妹版。在微博专业版上,专业人士可以互粉,并为新人作介绍,还可以得到工作机会。
6) 微信—微信是一个网络应用,可以让用户通过网络或Wifi来寻找朋友。微信主要的服务内容是信息和语音通讯。在海外或国外都可以使用,只要有网络连接。

5. 总结

不管是相对廉价的手机,还是高端的奢侈品,中国已经成为世界上增长最快的市场。在中国要想获得商业上的成功,关键要熟悉中国的文化、商业习俗,并了解网络在中国人日常生活中的地位。能够熟练运用以上提及的网站对希望扩大中国市场的外国商人来说是非常有好处的。中国有句话说得好:熟能生巧。

作者:Natalie Sammarco,中美中心国际关系硕士2014

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